Dalnavert Museum and Visitors' Centre: home to many

Dalnavert was a boarding house for nearly 40 years after Hugh John Macdonald passed away. /Dalnavert Archives

Dalnavert was a boarding house for nearly 40 years after Hugh John Macdonald passed away. /Dalnavert Archives

The history of Dalnavert Museum and Visitors' Centre extends beyond 1929 when the Macdonalds left the house. After Hugh John Macdonald passed away, he left all of the home’s belongings to Agnes, who moved to the Roslyn Apartments on Osborne Street. 

After Hugh John died, the house was owned by several people. The people who owned the house transformed it into a boarding and rooming house. In 1969, it was sold to a development company.  The development company intended to make the grounds into a parking lot. 

The home still has most of its original hinges. /Dalnavert Archives  

The home still has most of its original hinges. /Dalnavert Archives

 

But in the 1970s, the Manitoba Historical Society (MHS) together with several historical activists worked with the development company and made numerous offers to buy the house, ultimately succeeding.

Working with the City of Winnipeg and other organizations, MHS attained grants to restore the home. John Chivers and George Walker led the restoration, which cost roughly $559,000 and took several years to complete. 

Today, Dalnavert Museum and Visitors' Centre is a cultural hub, event centre, and a host to educational and entertainment programs.

For more information on events, tours, our operational hours, and past events go to and follow us on Facebook or Twitter.


The Architect

Charles H. Wheeler built many homes for prominent families in Winnipeg, along with other buildings such as churches and institutes. /Western Canada Pictorial Index

Charles H. Wheeler built many homes for prominent families in Winnipeg, along with other buildings such as churches and institutes. /Western Canada Pictorial Index

While little is known about his early life, Charles H. Wheeler left a lasting impression on Winnipeg.

He was born in April 1838 at Lutterworth, North West Leicestershire, England, and was married 20 years later to Annie Wakefield of Fairford, Gloucester.

He studied architecture and music in Birmingham, England and was an architect in England for about 20 years, according to reports. By 1882, he had immigrated to Winnipeg.

Wheeler soon worked for James Chisholm and within in a year of living in Winnipeg his design was chosen out of 44 submissions for the Holy Trinity Anglican Church on the corner of Graham Avenue and Donald Street. After that project, he established his own firm.

In 1893, Macdonald approached Wheeler to build Dalnavert.


HOURS

SPRING & SUMMER
WEDNESDAY TO FRIDAY:  

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12:00 pm - 4:00 pm

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Phone: 1(204)943-2835

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Email: info@dalnavertmuseum.ca