Adopt An Artifact 

Welcome to Dalnavert's new artifact adoption program!

Adopting an artifact at Dalnavert Museum is a fun and easy way to show your appreciation of Winnipeg’s cultural heritage, connect with your favourite object, and support the Museum. Your tax-deductible contribution will help us preserve our collection, while also helping to support other Museum activities, including exhibits, programs and school tours. Adoptions last for one year.

Dalnavert Spirit

Mini adoptable, $35 donation

Don’t want to choose just one adoptable? Spread the love and adopt the spirit of the house!

Ceramic Pug

Medium adoptable, $100 donation

Lady Macdonald was very fond of her pug, Brandy. She was so fond of him that after Brandy died, she got a taxidermist to stuff him, and displayed the pug in a wooden cage in the parlour. Alas, when Lady Macdonald sold the contents of the house after Sir Hugh’s death in 1929, loyal Brandy sold for only fifty cents.We are offering this piece for adoption in memory of dear Brandy. It is also a fine example of the kind of china that Lady Macdonald would have collected.

  Chinese Picnic Basket    Small adoptable, $50 donation   Nestled within this cloth-lined, woven basket rests a teapot and two matching teacups. The teapot depicts two women standing in front of a cherry tree. One woman is holding a branch from the tree, and the other is holding a fan. The front of the basket features a boldly studded metal plate with a decorative fish-shaped hook closure.

Chinese Picnic Basket

Small adoptable, $50 donation

Nestled within this cloth-lined, woven basket rests a teapot and two matching teacups. The teapot depicts two women standing in front of a cherry tree. One woman is holding a branch from the tree, and the other is holding a fan. The front of the basket features a boldly studded metal plate with a decorative fish-shaped hook closure.

Stanhope Pen - ADOPTED

September 17th, 2018

The proud parent is:

Tom Van Buekenhout

Dedication: Birthday gift

Small adoptable, $50 donation

In the Victorian era, technology allowed manufacturers to place miniature images inside ordinary objects such as pens, umbrellas, pipes, canes, necklaces, rings, etc. On one side of this pen there is a tiny, clear window that allows the viewer to see the images within. This particular pen features Irish scenes including Sackville Street, Bank of Ireland, Four Courts (Ireland’s main court house), St. Patrick’s Cathedral, Custom House (as neoclassical government building in Dublin), and Trinity College. All in one pen! Other Stanhope objects contain pictures depicting religious subject matter, family portraits, and even erotica!

  Papier-mâché Writing Set    Small adoptable, $50 donation   Within Dalnavert we have multiple items made out of this carefully crafted and labour intensive material including: serving trays, table tops, and of course, writing sets. While papier-mâché is often seen as a strictly decorative art form, Victorian papier-mâché objects tended to be functional as well as aesthetically pleasing.

Papier-mâché Writing Set

Small adoptable, $50 donation

Within Dalnavert we have multiple items made out of this carefully crafted and labour intensive material including: serving trays, table tops, and of course, writing sets. While papier-mâché is often seen as a strictly decorative art form, Victorian papier-mâché objects tended to be functional as well as aesthetically pleasing.

  Jack Macdonald's Stamp Collection    Medium adoptable, $100 donation   This book originally belonged to Jack Macdonald, we know this because he had signed his name inside the front cover. Following Jack's death in 1905, Edgar Jordan Tarr (a lawyer at the Macdonald, Haggart, & Whitlaw firm) gifted the book back to the Macdonald family since he did not collect stamps.

Jack Macdonald's Stamp Collection

Medium adoptable, $100 donation

This book originally belonged to Jack Macdonald, we know this because he had signed his name inside the front cover. Following Jack's death in 1905, Edgar Jordan Tarr (a lawyer at the Macdonald, Haggart, & Whitlaw firm) gifted the book back to the Macdonald family since he did not collect stamps.

  Art Nouveau Vase    Large adoptable, $300 donation   Pictured here is one of two matching Art Nouveau vases in our collection. These stoneware vases have subtle Art Nouveau traits including their fluid lines, Ruskin medallions, and their brown and green colouring which speak to this naturalistic style. The vases also belong to the Arts and Crafts movement, a style of art construction valued for its simple, anti-industrial forms.

Art Nouveau Vase

Large adoptable, $300 donation

Pictured here is one of two matching Art Nouveau vases in our collection. These stoneware vases have subtle Art Nouveau traits including their fluid lines, Ruskin medallions, and their brown and green colouring which speak to this naturalistic style. The vases also belong to the Arts and Crafts movement, a style of art construction valued for its simple, anti-industrial forms.

  Tortoiseshell Needle Case    Small adoptable, $50 donation   Thomas Lund began a business selling pens and quills in 1804, and by 1815, had expanded that business and began manufacturing cutlery, writing boxes, and other luxury items such as this needle holder.

Tortoiseshell Needle Case

Small adoptable, $50 donation

Thomas Lund began a business selling pens and quills in 1804, and by 1815, had expanded that business and began manufacturing cutlery, writing boxes, and other luxury items such as this needle holder.

Tussy-Mussy - ADOPTED!

Sept 12th, 2018

The proud parents are:

The Dalnavert Garden Committee

Dedication: in appreciation of Jennie Wevursky for more than 10 years of nurturing Dalnavert’s gardens. Thank you.

Small adoptable, $50 donation

People used to carry around small bouquets of flowers, known as tussy-mussies, to ward off unpleasant smells. By Queen Victoria’s time, tussy-mussy referred to the holder, not the flowers, and they were used more as personal accessories. This tussy-mussy has a mother-of-pearl handle and a brass top. The mirrors would have allowed the holder to see what was going on behind them, or possibly to scope out nearby cuties at a ball. Daisy Macdonald might have used a tussy-mussy like this during her coming-out ball in 1896.

Lady Macdonald's Punch Bowl

Large adoptable, $300 donation

This porcelain bowl is one of the few items that belonged to the Macdonald family in the Dalnavert Museum collection. It was made during the late Qing dynasty (ca. 1875) in Jingdezhen, China, which has been known for its porcelain manufacture for over a thousand years. Even though it was made specifically for the export market, this bowl would have been a mark of status in the days before everything was made in China. Lady Macdonald used it as her punch bowl.

  Victorian Hair Wreath    Large adoptable, $300 donation   Hair wreaths were an artistic response to the concept of a family tree during the Victorian era. Strands of hair were collected from family members and crafted into intricate works of art—mostly arranged in floral designs, and were often three dimensional. These creations put on display the mosaic of hair colours belonging to a particular family. Alongside the woven, crocheted, and crimped hair, other decorative elements could be found including glass beads and velvet ribbon.

Victorian Hair Wreath

Large adoptable, $300 donation

Hair wreaths were an artistic response to the concept of a family tree during the Victorian era. Strands of hair were collected from family members and crafted into intricate works of art—mostly arranged in floral designs, and were often three dimensional. These creations put on display the mosaic of hair colours belonging to a particular family. Alongside the woven, crocheted, and crimped hair, other decorative elements could be found including glass beads and velvet ribbon.

  Silken Drawers    Medium adoptable, $100 donation   Underwear as we know them today were a relatively new garment during the Victorian era. The earliest underwear prototypes often included an opening at the back and had a knee-length cut. This particular pair of underwear were fancier than most, as they are cuffed and detailed with lace trim.

Silken Drawers

Medium adoptable, $100 donation

Underwear as we know them today were a relatively new garment during the Victorian era. The earliest underwear prototypes often included an opening at the back and had a knee-length cut. This particular pair of underwear were fancier than most, as they are cuffed and detailed with lace trim.

  Sherry & Port Decanters    Medium adoptable, $100 donation   These clear glass decanters have elegantly tapered necks and intricate intercut detailing. During the time period that the Macdonald family lived in Dalnavert, decanters such as these were used for alcohol—specifically sherry and port. Sherry was considered the “woman’s drink” in the late 19th century. It is dry in texture and generally has a lower alcohol content than Port. Conversely, Port was considered the “man’s drink” and is richer, sweeter, and tends to have a higher alcohol content.

Sherry & Port Decanters

Medium adoptable, $100 donation

These clear glass decanters have elegantly tapered necks and intricate intercut detailing. During the time period that the Macdonald family lived in Dalnavert, decanters such as these were used for alcohol—specifically sherry and port. Sherry was considered the “woman’s drink” in the late 19th century. It is dry in texture and generally has a lower alcohol content than Port. Conversely, Port was considered the “man’s drink” and is richer, sweeter, and tends to have a higher alcohol content.

  Ceramic Staffordshire Dogs    Medium adoptable, $100 donation   Two white ground ceramic dogs that live in Daisy's room. They have gray shading accenting their paws. Both dogs are embellished with gilt—a thin covering of gold leaf or gold paint. The gilt flowers and other gilt markings appear on the dogs' collars, leashes, and throughout their fur.

Ceramic Staffordshire Dogs

Medium adoptable, $100 donation

Two white ground ceramic dogs that live in Daisy's room. They have gray shading accenting their paws. Both dogs are embellished with gilt—a thin covering of gold leaf or gold paint. The gilt flowers and other gilt markings appear on the dogs' collars, leashes, and throughout their fur.

  Silver Claret Jug/Ewer    Large adoptable, $300 donation   This style of jug was used for wines (mostly red). 'Claret' comes from the Latin word for 'clear', 'pale', or 'light-colored', and was a nickname for Bordeaux wines, wines made from grapes grown in southwest France. This particular piece features an elegantly arched handle, a full barrel body, and a wide pouring lip.

Silver Claret Jug/Ewer

Large adoptable, $300 donation

This style of jug was used for wines (mostly red). 'Claret' comes from the Latin word for 'clear', 'pale', or 'light-colored', and was a nickname for Bordeaux wines, wines made from grapes grown in southwest France. This particular piece features an elegantly arched handle, a full barrel body, and a wide pouring lip.

  Sir Hugh J. Macdonald's Book    Medium adoptable, $100 donation   This book belonged to Sir Hugh John Macdonald. It is his personal copy of the criminal code. Sir Hugh John practised law in Winnipeg, and would have been well versed with this material. There are notes in the book written by Sir Hugh John himself!

Sir Hugh J. Macdonald's Book

Medium adoptable, $100 donation

This book belonged to Sir Hugh John Macdonald. It is his personal copy of the criminal code. Sir Hugh John practised law in Winnipeg, and would have been well versed with this material. There are notes in the book written by Sir Hugh John himself!

More adoptables to come!

Pickle Castor

Small adoptable, $50 donation

It is a truth universally acknowledged that the Victorians decorated anything that stood still long enough. As this has only hands (check the tongs!) and not feet, it did not stand a chance. The level of detail on the silver plate and pressed glass are quite stunning (again, see the tongs), but they belie a humble purpose: pickle castors were made to serve pickled produce. The pickle inside is included in the adoption, although consuming it is not.

Piano

Super-sized adoptable, $800 donation

Once upon a time, people had to make their own entertainment. Often, this burden was placed on young women of quality like Lady Macdonald and Daisy Macdonald, who would have learned how to sing and play the piano as a part of their educations. This piano was made by the Kirkman company in England in the 1880s. This is the same company that made Thomas Jefferson’s harpsichord in the 1780s. Unfortunately, the soundboard on our piano is cracked, so adoption does not include serenading Dalnavert staff, volunteers, visitors, etc.

  Papier-mâché Chess Table    Large adoptable, $300 donation   In the 19th century, making furniture and other objects out of papier-mâché was a popular method of construction. The process involved gluing and pressing together many sheets of black paper into a mold. This chess table is a more luxurious example of Victorian papier-mâché due to its mother-of-pearl and gold embellishments.

Papier-mâché Chess Table

Large adoptable, $300 donation

In the 19th century, making furniture and other objects out of papier-mâché was a popular method of construction. The process involved gluing and pressing together many sheets of black paper into a mold. This chess table is a more luxurious example of Victorian papier-mâché due to its mother-of-pearl and gold embellishments.

  Portrait of Sir John A. Macdonald    Super-sized adoptable, $800 donation   Hanging painted portraits of family members and ancestors in gathering rooms such as dining rooms and parlours was a popular thing to do in the late 19th century. This piece is an original portrait of Sir John A. Macdonald, the first Prime Minister of Canada, and the father of Hugh John Macdonald, for whom the Dalnavert house was built in 1895.

Portrait of Sir John A. Macdonald

Super-sized adoptable, $800 donation

Hanging painted portraits of family members and ancestors in gathering rooms such as dining rooms and parlours was a popular thing to do in the late 19th century. This piece is an original portrait of Sir John A. Macdonald, the first Prime Minister of Canada, and the father of Hugh John Macdonald, for whom the Dalnavert house was built in 1895.

  Hatpins    Small adoptable, $50 donation   These decorative hatpins would have been worn by middle to high class women to keep their hair and hats in place. Hatpins often reflected the aesthetic trends of the time (Arts & Crafts; Art Nouveau), and were very popular during the Victorian era. These particular hatpins are made with various jewels, glass, and sterling silver components.

Hatpins

Small adoptable, $50 donation

These decorative hatpins would have been worn by middle to high class women to keep their hair and hats in place. Hatpins often reflected the aesthetic trends of the time (Arts & Crafts; Art Nouveau), and were very popular during the Victorian era. These particular hatpins are made with various jewels, glass, and sterling silver components.

  Davenport Desk    Super-sized adoptable, $800 donation   This compact desk has an oblong top that is positioned at an ideal angle for writing letters—a very common practice at the time. The ample storage space under the lid and the drawers descending the length of the unit allow for ample storage space and are typical characteristics of a Davenport desk.

Davenport Desk

Super-sized adoptable, $800 donation

This compact desk has an oblong top that is positioned at an ideal angle for writing letters—a very common practice at the time. The ample storage space under the lid and the drawers descending the length of the unit allow for ample storage space and are typical characteristics of a Davenport desk.

  Macdonalds' Hearth Jars    Large adoptable, $300 donation   Pictured here is one of the two matching hearth jars that belonged to the Macdonald family, and were part of the original furnishing of Dalnavert. Both jars are 2 ½ feet tall and are decorated with flowers, birds, butterflies and other naturalistic designs, making these true Victorian pieces.

Macdonalds' Hearth Jars

Large adoptable, $300 donation

Pictured here is one of the two matching hearth jars that belonged to the Macdonald family, and were part of the original furnishing of Dalnavert. Both jars are 2 ½ feet tall and are decorated with flowers, birds, butterflies and other naturalistic designs, making these true Victorian pieces.

Adoptions can be made anytime. Please fill out one of these forms and send it to donations@dalnavertmuseum.ca 


PERKS!

Mini Adoptable - $35 donation

-Charitable tax receipt for the full amount of your donation.

-Recognition of your generosity under the "Dalnavert Spirit" line in our online gallery.

 
 

Small Adoptable - $50 donation

-Charitable tax receipt for the full amount of your donation.

-Photograph of your Artifact sent to you in digital form.

-Recognition as the adoptive "parent" of artifact in our online gallery and in our annual report. 

Medium Adoptable - $100 donation

ALL OF THE ABOVE + a photograph with your adopted artifact which will be yours in digital form and will appear in the online gallery.

 
 

Large Adoptable - $300 donation

ALL OF THE ABOVE + a private meeting with your artifact and a member of the collections team. 

Super Sized Adoptable - $800

ALL OF THE ABOVE + an exclusive, personalized tour of the Dalnavert Museum with the Curator + first right to continue adoption after one year.